Boards and Committees

Prof Helmut Coing

Chairman of the Academic Advisory Council from 1976 until 1991

From 1978 to 1984, Helmut Coing (1912–2000) was Vice President of the Max Planck Society and from 1964 to 1980 Founding Director and Head of the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History in Frankfurt/Main. In 1973 he received the German order of merit Pour le Mérite for Sciences and Arts, of which he was Chancellor from 1984 to 1992.

After studying Law in Kiel, Munich, Göttingen and Lille, Helmut Coing obtained his PhD in 1935 in Göttingen and in 1938 qualified as professor at Goethe University Frankfurt. Drafted into the German armed forces in 1939, he returned from captivity in 1945. From 1948 until his retirement in 1980 he was Professor of Civil Law, Roman Law and History of Law at Goethe University Frankfurt. From 1955 to 1957 he was Rector of the university and from 1956 to 1957 Chairman of the West German Rectors’ Conference and subsequently of the Wissenschaftsrat from 1958 to 1960. As advisor to the founder, he played a crucial role in the establishment of the Gerda Henkel Foundation in 1976.

In 1958 Helmut Coing received the Goetheplakette from the City of Frankfurt/Main and in 1974 Germany’s Grand Federal Cross of Merit with Star. He was an Officer of the French Legion of Honour (1966) and a member of the order Pour le Mérite for Sciences and Arts (1973). In 1990 he was awarded the Commander’s Cross of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic, Germany’s Grand Federal Cross of Merit with Star and Sash, and the Hessian Order of Merit. In addition, he received honorary doctorates from the universities of Lyon (1959), Montpellier (1959), Vienna (1965), Aberdeen (1968), Brussels (1975), and Uppsala (1977).

The Max Planck Institute for European Legal History in Frankfurt/Main launched the Helmut Coing Prize in 2008. It is awarded every three years.

Helmut Coing was a member of the Gerda Henkel Foundation’s Academic Advisory Council from the very start and even after leaving the Foundation continued to support it in an advisory capacity. On the 15th anniversary of the Foundation’s establishment Lisa Maskell thanked him with the following words: “Prof. Coing encouraged me to set up the Foundation. It would not have come about without his support. It was upon his advice that our work focusses on promoting the historical humanities. Moreover, the selection of the Academic Advisory Council, which is still active today and has worked successfully and harmoniously for over a decade and a half, is based on his proposals.”

Prof Josef Fleckenstein

Deputy Chairman of the Academic Advisory Council from 1976 until 1991

Josef Fleckenstein (1919–2004) was President of the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities from 1980 to 1982 and from 1984 to 1986. Prior to that, from 1971 to 1987 he was Director of the Medieval Department of the Max Planck Institute for History in Göttingen, where he also held an honorary professorship in the Faculty of Philosophy.

While studying History in 1940 and 1941 in Leipzig and Halle, he was active in the Reich Labour Service and the Luftwaffe. In 1943 he spent several years in a prison camp in North Africa and was not able to resume his studies of History, German, History of Art and Latin Philology until 1948 in Mainz and 1949 in Freiburg. He obtained his doctorate in 1952 and qualified as professor in 1958 at the University of Freiburg. Following a temporary professorship in 1960 at Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, in 1962 he was offered a full professorship in Frankfurt and in 1965 in Freiburg. After retiring, in winter semester 1988–89 he taught as a visiting professor in Zurich.

Josef Fleckenstein was a member of the Senate and Joint Committee of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) as well as a member and at times Chairman of the transition committee at the Ministry of Culture of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. He was a corresponding member of Koninklijke Hollandsche Maatschappij der Wetenschappen and Monumenta Germaniae Historica (1968), a member of the British Academy (1971), member of the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities (1973), corresponding member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (1982), and an external member of the Akademie gemeinnütziger Wissenschaften zu Erfurt. In 1994 Fleckenstein received the Carl-Friedrich-Gauß-Medaille from the Braunschweigische Wissenschaftliche Gesellschaft.

Josef Fleckenstein was Deputy Chairman of the Academic Advisory Council from the inception of the Gerda Henkel Foundation. In 1991 Lisa Maskell thanked him in a committee meeting as follows: “We are indebted to Prof. Fleckenstein for the many years in which he has given us such valuable advice, especially in the field of medieval research. His factual and personal knowledge has facilitated many of our decisions and his committed contributions to discussions have always enriched our meetings.”

Prof Thomas Nipperdey

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 1976 until 1992

From 1973 to 1980, Thomas Nipperdey (1927–1992) was Chairman of the Bund Freiheit der Wissenschaft (BFW) and subsequently, as a committee member, part of the extended directorate. In 1990 he was appointed a full member of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities.

From 1946 to 1953 Thomas Nipperdey studied Philosophy and History at the universities of Cologne, Göttingen and Cambridge. He obtained his doctorate in 1953 and took his state exams one year later. He subsequently received a scholarship from the Kommission für Geschichte des Parlamentarismus und der politischen Parteien and was an assistant at the Max Planck Institute for History in Göttingen, where he qualified as professor in 1961.

In 1962 Thomas Nipperdey held the Chair of Modern History in Giessen and in 1963 accepted an appointment to Technische Hochschule Karlsruhe. Simultaneously he lectured at Heidelberg University. In 1967 he went to Freie Universität Berlin and in 1971 to LMU Munich. He also lectured as a visiting professor at the universities of Oxford, Stanford and Princeton. From 1983 to 1992 he was a member of the Scientific Advisory Council of the Fritz Thyssen Foundation.

Thomas Nipperdey received various distinctions in recognition of his work, including the Historikerpreis der Stadt Münster in 1984, the German Federal Cross of Merit in 1989, and the Bavarian Order of Merit and Prize of the Historisches Kolleg in 1992.

As a member of the Academic Advisory Council, Thomas Nipperdey advised the Gerda Henkel Foundation for over 15 years as of its establishment.

Prof Thomas W. Gaehtgens

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 1991 until 2000

Thomas W. Gaehtgens (born 1940) is Director of the Getty Research Institute (GRI) in Los Angeles and in 1997 was Founding Director of the German Center for Art History (Centre Allemand de l’Histoire de l’Art) in Paris. In 2009 he was awarded the Grand Prix de la Francophonie de l’Académie Française and in 2015 the Prix Mondial Simone et Cino del Duca from the Institut de France.

Thomas W. Gaehtgens was awarded a doctorate in 1966 from the Department of Art History at the University of Bonn and qualified as professor in 1972 at Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, where he subsequently became Extraordinary Professor in the Art History Department. Following a research residency at the US Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, New Jersey, in 1980 he was appointed Professor of Art History at Freie Universität Berlin, where he remained until retiring in 2006.

From 1985 to 1986 he conducted research at the J. Paul Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities in Santa Monica, California and in 1995 accepted a visiting professorship at the Collège de France. From 1992 to 1996 he was President of the Comité International d’Histoire de l’Art (CIHA) and from 1998 to 1999 Chaire européenne at the Collège de France. In 2004 he was awarded an honorary doctorate from the Courtauld Institute of Art in London and in 2011 from Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV). He was moreover elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His academic works focus primarily on French art from the 18th to the early 20th century.

Thomas W. Gaehtgens was a member of the Gerda Henkel Foundation’s Academic Advisory Council from 1991 to 2000.

Prof Lothar Gall

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 1992 until 2000 Chairman from 1996 until 2000

Lothar Gall (born 1936) was Chairman of the Frankfurter Historische Kommission and corresponding member of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities. From 1997 until 2012 he headed the Historical Commission at the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities and from 1992 until 1996 chaired the Verband der Historiker und Historikerinnen Deutschlands. He was professor in the Dept. of History at Goethe University Frankfurt until his retirement in 2005.

Lothar Gall read History, Romance Studies and German Studies at LMU Munich and earned his PhD there in 1960. He thereupon received a DFG scholarship at the Mainz Institute of European History between 1962 and 1965. He went to the University of Cologne, where he qualified as professor in Medieval and Modern History in 1967. From 1968 until 1972 he taught at Giessen University and subsequently at Freie Universität Berlin, until he was appointed Professor in the Dept. of History at Goethe University Frankfurt in 1975. He was given leave in 1972–3 to undertake a guest professorship in Oxford.

From 1975 to 2015 Lothar Gall was editor of Historische Zeitschrift. He has been awarded the Preis der Wolf-Erich-Kellner-Gedächtnisstiftung (1968), the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize of the DFG (1988), the Herbert-Quandt-Medien-Preis (1990), the Balzan Prize for History: Societies of the 19th and 20th Centuries (1993), the Grand Federal Cross of Merit with Star, and the Hessian Order of Merit with Star.

Lothar Gall was elected to the Gerda Henkel Foundation’s Academic Advisory Council in 1992, serving as Chairman from 1996 until 2000.

Prof Johannes Fried

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 1992 until 2000 Deputy Chairman from 1993 until 2000

From 2001 until 2013 Johannes Fried (born 1942) was Chairman of the German commission working on the Regesta Imperii at the Academy of Sciences and Literature Mainz and from 1998 until 2005 Chairman of the Trägerverein des Deutschen Studienzentrums in Venice. He was awarded the Carl-Friedrich-Gauss-Medaille in May 2015.

Johannes Fried studied History, German and Political Science at Heidelberg University from 1964 until 1970. He was awarded a PhD in 1970 and worked as a research assistant at Heidelberg University until 1979. He qualified as professor in 1977, again in Heidelberg. Following a teaching post in summer semester 1980 at what is now Technische Universität Darmstadt he was appointed Professor at the University of Cologne. In 1982 he became Professor of Medieval History at Goethe University Frankfurt and taught there until his retirement in 2009. From 1990 until 1991 Johannes Fried was awarded a scholarship from the Historisches Kolleg in Munich and from 1995 to 1996 was Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 1995 he received the Prize of the Historisches Kolleg in Munich for his work “Der Weg in die Geschichte”.

From 1988 until 1991 Johannes Fried was Chairman of the Konstanzer Arbeitskreis für mittelalterliche Geschichte and from 1996 until 2000 Chairman of the Verband der Historiker und Historikerinnen Deutschlands. He was awarded the Sigmund-Freud-Preis für wissenschaftliche Prosa by the German Academy for Language and Literature in 2006 and an honorary doctorate from the Philosophy Faculty at RWTH Aachen University in 2009. He has co-edited Historische Zeitschrift since 1990 and from 1994 until 2012 was editor of Deutsches Archiv für Erforschung des Mittelalters.

Johannes Fried was appointed to the Gerda Henkel Foundation’s Academic Advisory Council in 1992, becoming Deputy Chairman just one year later.

Prof Franz Georg Maier, Hon. FSA

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 1976 until 1996 Chairman from 1992 until 1996

Member of the Board of Trustees from 1996 until 2010 Deputy Chairman from 1998 until 2005 Honorary member from 2006 until 2010

Franz Georg Maier (1926–2014) was Professor of Ancient History at the University of Zurich from 1972 until his retirement in 1994. After studying at the universities in Tübingen, Zurich and Rome he graduated with a PhD in 1951 and qualified as professor in 1957 in Tübingen. From 1963 until 1966 he was Professor of Ancient History in Frankfurt/Main and from 1966 until 1972 Professor of History at the University of Konstanz, of which he was a founding member.

From 1952 until 1955 Franz Georg Maier worked as a member of the British Kouklia Expedition in Cyprus; from 1966 he led the excavations in Old Paphos (Cyprus) on behalf of the German Archaeological Institute. From 1977 until 1978 he was President of the Commission for the Swiss School of Archaeology in Greece (ESAG) and in 1992–93 Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, USA. Moreover, he was a full member of the German Archaeological Institute and Honorary Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London.

Franz Georg Maier was a member of the Gerda Henkel Foundation’s Academic Advisory Council since its establishment and sat on its Board of Trustees as of 1995, becoming an honorary member in 2006.

Prof Hans-Joachim Gehrke

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 1997 until 2005 Chairman from 2001 until 2005

Member of the Board of Trustees since 2006 Deputy Chairman of the Board of Trustees since 2014

Hans-Joachim Gehrke (born 1945) was President of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin from 2008 until 2011. Since 2011 he has been Senior Advisor to the Rector at the University of Freiburg and Director of Outreach at University College Freiburg. He is Honorary Professor of Ancient History and Classical Philology at Freie Universität Berlin.

Prior to that, from 1987 until 2008 Hans-Joachim Gehrke was full Professor of Ancient History at the University of Freiburg. After studying History, Classical Philology, Philosophy and Education, he obtained his PhD in 1973 at Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, where he subsequently worked as a research assistant until qualifying as professor in 1982. From 1982 until 1984 Hans-Joachim Gehrke held a professorship in Würzburg and from 1984 until 1987 he was full Professor at Freie Universität Berlin. From 1991 to 1993 he held guest professorships at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the universities in Zurich and Perugia. In 1999 he was Visiting Scholar at the Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington, D.C. and in the 2012–13 academic year was Visiting Professor for Ancient Cultural History at LMU Munich. From 1999 until 2005 he was a member of the Senate and the Joint Committee of the DFG.

Hans-Joachim Gehrke is a corresponding member of the Akademie gemeinnütziger Wissenschaften zu Erfurt and of the Archaeological Institute of America, member of the Executive Committee of the German Archaeological Institute, and full member of the Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, and Academia Europaea. He is Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Forschungsstätte der Evangelischen Studiengemeinschaft (FEST) and associate member of the Graduate School “Factual and Fictional Narration” at the University of Freiburg.

His research activities focus on the historical geography of the Central and Eastern Mediterranean region, social conflicts and social integration, intercultural relations and migrations as well as perceptions of history and collective identities.

Hans-Joachim Gehrke has been a member of the Gerda Henkel Foundation’s Board of Trustees since 2006. Prior to that he was a member of the Academic Advisory Council as of 1997, serving as Chairman from 2001 until 2005.

Prof Andreas Tönnesmann

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 2001 until 2008 Chairman from 2006 until 2008

Andreas Tönnesmann (1953–2014) was full Professor of Art and Architectural History at ETH Zurich from 2001 until 2014. From 2006 until 2010 he headed the Institute for the History and Theory of Architecture (gta) at ETH Zurich and from 2007 until 2009 the Department of Architecture. In 2002 he was appointed titular professor at the University of Basel and in 2013 was invited to the Hebrew University in Jerusalem as visiting professor.

Andreas Tönnesmann studied Art History and Literature at German and Italian universities. He gained a PhD in 1980 from the University of Bonn. After four years working in research at the Max Planck Institute in Rome (Bibliotheca Hertziana) he qualified as professor in 1989 in the context of his assistantship at the Chair of Art History at the Technical University of Munich. In 1990 he temporarily held the Chair of Architectural History at RWTH Aachen University. In 1991 he was appointed to the University of Bonn; in 1996 to the Chair of Art History at the University of Augsburg and in 2000 at the University of Bonn.

Andreas Tönnesmann was a member of the jury for the Prix Jubilé awarded by the Schweizerische Akademie der Geistes- und Sozialwissenshaften and of the university commission of the Istituto Svizzero di Roma. He was peer reviewer for the DFG and member of the Board of Trustees of the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz and Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel. There he was also a member of the working group for Renaissance research. He was a member of the managing body of the inter-university ProDocProgramm “Art and Cultural Transfer since the Renaissance”, funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. He belonged to the DFG Research Training Group on “The Renaissance and its Reception” at the University of Bonn. He fulfilled voluntary functions for the Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes, Evangelisches Studienwerk Villigst, Centres d’études supérieures de la Renaissance in Tours, and the European Science Foundation. As of 1991 Andreas Tönnesmann was co-editor of Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte. His research and publication activities mainly revolved around architecture and visual art of the Early Modern and Modern Age as well as culture and literature of the 20th century, with a special focus on Thomas Mann.

From 2001 until 2008 Andreas Tönnesmann was a member of the Gerda Henkel Foundation’s Academic Advisory Council. He was elected Chairman in 2006.

Prof Heinz Duchhardt

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 2001 until 2002

Heinz Duchhardt (born 1943) has been a full member of the Academy of Sciences and Literature Mainz since 2001 and since 2003 corresponding member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and external member of the Finnish Academy of Science and Letters. From 2009 until 2015 he was President of the Max Weber Foundation and from 1994 until 2011 Director of the Department of Universal History at the Mainz Institute of European History.

From 1963 to 1968 he studied History, Political Science and Art History in Mainz, Bonn and Vienna. He received his doctorate in 1968 and qualified as professor in 1974. Following several temporary professorships from 1980 until 1984 in Mannheim, Stuttgart and Bonn, in 1984 he was appointed Professor at the University of Bayreuth and in 1988 at the University of Münster, where he worked until 1995. He declined an appointment to Jena in 1993. He regularly taught as visiting professor at the Chinese Quingdao University.

Alongside numerous other memberships, Heinz Duchhardt has since 1995 been a member of the Historical Commission at the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities and between 2000 and 2008 was a member of the advisory councils of the Deutsches Historisches Institut in Paris and Moscow. Moreover, from 1998 until 2008 he was a Board member of the Freiherr-vom-Stein-Gesellschaft. In 2011 he was awarded an honorary doctorate from Smolensk State University.

Heinz Duchhardt was a member of the Gerda Henkel Foundation’s Academic Advisory Council from 2001 until 2002.

Universitaet Konstanz, 20.06.2007
Foto: Michael Latz/Universitaet Konstanz

Prof Rudolf Schlögl

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 2002 until 2010 Chairman from 2009 until 2010

Rudolf Schlögl (born 1955) has been Professor of Modern History at the University of Konstanz since 1995. He initiated a Collaborative Research Centre there in 2000, which he headed until 2009 and in which he conducted research on the politics of the premodern city. Since 2006 he has been spokesman for one of the first German centres of excellence in the humanities entitled “Cultural Foundation of Integration”. In 2009 the DFG awarded him a Reinhart Koselleck Project on the media-related prerequisites of socialisation in Early Modern times in Europe.

Rudolf Schlögl read German Studies, History and Social Studies at the University of Augsburg and Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg and obtained his PhD in 1986. After qualifying as professor in 1992 in Münster and completing temporary professorships at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, in 1994 he was appointed Professor of the Regional History of Saxony-Anhalt at Martin Luther University, before going to the University of Konstanz. He declined later appointments.

Rudolf Schlögl has initiated several scientific publication series and served as their editor. Among others, he is co-editor of the journal Geschichte und Gesellschaft. Moreover, he has been extensively involved in scientific organisation. He performed functions within the Verband der Historiker und Historikerinnen Deutschlands and in several academic advisory councils and boards of trustees of scientific institutions and foundations. He has been a member of the Scientific Advisory Council of the Fritz Thyssen Foundation since 2008, representing it since 2014 on the Board of Trustees of the Deutsches Studienzentrum in Venedig. In 2014 he was appointed a member of the Wissenschaftsrat’s Expert Committee on Large-Scale Research Facilities.

In 2002 Rudolf Schlögl was elected to the Gerda Henkel Foundation’s Academic Advisory Council, serving as its Chairman from 2009 until 2010.

Prof Martin Zimmermann

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 2006 until 2013 Chairman from 2011 until 2013

Martin Zimmermann (born 1959) has been Professor of Ancient History at LMU Munich since 2002. After graduating in History and German Studies at the University of Tübingen and Kiel University, he completed his PhD (1990) and qualified as professor (1997) in Tübingen.

As of 1989 Martin Zimmermann was involved in archaeological field research in southwestern Turkey, comprising various projects running until 2013. Between 2005 and 2012 he conducted an international research project on the history of the rural areas of the royal city of Pergamon. From 2011 to 2013 he headed, together with Prof. Jacques des Courtils from the University of Bordeaux, the project “Xanthiaca”, which received funding to the order of around one million euros in the context of the cooperation programme of the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) and the DFG.

Martin Zimmermann is spokesman of the Research Training Group “Forms of Prestige in Ancient Cultures” at LMU Munich and was coordinator of the DFG Priority Programme “The Hellenistic Polis as a Living Space. Urban Structures and Civic Identity between Tradition and Innovation”. Since 2002 he has been a full member of the German Archaeological Institute, a member of the advisory boards of a number of international specialist journals and peer reviewer for the publications of the Cluster of Excellence TOPOI (Berlin). He was elected to the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities in 2013. Martin Zimmermann additionally acts as a consultant for film projects.

In his research and teaching activities Martin Zimmermann focusses on historical geography, archaeological field research into rural development structures and life on the urban periphery, ancient historiography, image and textual sources of extreme forms of violence, and the history of media representation. He has written and edited history books for children and young people.

Martin Zimmermann was a member of the Gerda Henkel Foundation’s Academic Advisory Council from 2006 until 2013. He became Chairman in 2011.

Prof Willibald Steinmetz

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 2006 until 2013

Willibald Steinmetz (born 1957) has been Professor of General History with a special focus on Historical Policy Research at Bielefeld University since 2003. He read History and Romance Studies in Münster, Montpellier and Bielefeld and completed his PhD at Bielefeld University in 1990.

From 1992 until 1996 Willibald Steinmetz worked as a research assistant at the German Historical Institute London. In 2000 he qualified as professor at Ruhr-Universität Bochum, where he worked as a research assistant until 2003, taking breaks to embark on temporary professorships in Cologne (2001) and Konstanz (2002). During this time he also completed a turn as visiting researcher at Bielefeld University (2001/02) and a guest professorship at the International University Bremen (2003).

Willibald Steinmetz was spokesman of the DFG Collaborative Research Centre “The Political as Communicative Space in History”. His research topics encompass historical semantics and conceptual history as well as the political history of Western and Central Europe, in particular of Great Britain, in the 19th and 20th centuries.

From 2006 until 2013 Willibald Steinmetz was a member of the Academic Advisory Council of the Gerda Henkel Foundation.

Prof Andreas Beyer

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 2009 until 2016 Chairman from 2014 until 2016

Andreas Beyer (born 1957) is Professor of Early Modern Art History at the University of Basel. He read Art History, Classical Archaeology, Romance Studies and Theatre Studies at the universities in Munich, Florence, and Frankfurt/Main. He graduated with a doctorate in 1985. From 1986 until 1988 he received a scholarship from the Max Planck Society at Bibliotheca Hertziana in Rome and subsequently worked as a university assistant at the Department of Art History at the University of Bonn, where he qualified as professor in 1994.

From 1993 to 1994 he was Senior Research Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and from 1994 until 1997 Professor of Modern Art History in the Art History Department at Friedrich Schiller University Jena. He subsequently held the Chair of Art History at RWTH Aachen University until 2003. During this time he completed several guest residencies in the USA: In 1997 Andreas Beyer was Fellow at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Mass., in 1998 Scholar at the Getty Research Institute for the Art  and the Humanities in Los Angeles, and in 2000 Clark Visiting Professor on the Williams College Graduate Program in Williamstown, Mass. From 1999 until 2002 Andreas Beyer was Vice Rector at RWTH Aachen University before moving to the University of Basel in 2003 to take up the post of Professor of Early Modern Art History. From February 2009 until February 2014 he was Director of the German Center for Art History in Paris. Andreas Beyer has been co-editor of Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte since 1999. Until 2005 he was membre suppléant of the Comité International d’Histoire de l’Art (C.I.H.A.) and from 2003 until 2006 member of the Senate and Grants Committee for matters relating to the DFG’s Collaborative Research Centres. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of Klassik Stiftung Weimar, Project Manager for EIKONES at the National Centre of Competence in Research of the Swiss National Science Foundation, and President of the Academic Committee of the Swiss Institute for Art Research in Zurich.

Andreas Beyer works in particular in the research fields of art and architecture of the Modern Age and Classicism, art in Goethe’s era, and methodology.

Prof Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger

Member of the Academic Advisory Council from 2011 until 2018 Chairwoman from 2017 until 2018

Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger read German Studies, History and History of Art in Cologne, where she also completed her PhD and qualified as professor. Since September 2018 she has been Rector of the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. Prior to that she was, from 1997, Professor of Early Modern History in the University of Münster’s History Faculty. In 2005 the DFG awarded her the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize, and in 2017 she received the Leipzig Book Fair Prize in the non-fiction category for her work Maria Theresia. Die Kaiserin in ihrer Zeit and the Sigmund-Freud-Preis für wissenschaftliche Prosa from the German Academy for Language and Literature.

Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger was spokeswoman for the DFG-funded Collaborative Research Centre 496 “Symbolic Communication and Social Value Systems from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution” and is currently spokeswoman for the Cluster of Excellence “Religion and Politics in Pre-Modern and Modern Cultures”. She has edited the magazine Zeitschrift für historische Forschung since 2003. She is a full member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, and the Historical Commission at the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities. In 2007 she received an honorary doctorate from the École normale supérieure de Lyon and in 2015 she was elected to the Academia Europaea. From 2015 until 2016 Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger was a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin.

Her research interests lie in the cultural and constitutional history of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, the history of ideas of the Enlightenment, and the history of political-social symbols and rituals in Early Modern times.